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Pogledaj Full Version : Integrating Civic Responsibility into the Curriculum



Željko Zidarić
28th-May-2012, 04:36 AM
Download PDF (http://www.aacc.nche.edu/Resources/aaccprograms/horizons/Documents/cr_guide_2nd.pdf)

Edited by
Karla Gottlied and Gail Robinson


Introduction .................................................. ..................................1

Chapter 1
The Need for Civic Responsibility in Service Learning .......................5

Chapter 2
Defining Civic Responsibility.................................... ......................13

Chapter 3
The Practice of Civic Responsibility ...............................................21

Chapter 4
Assessing Civic Responsibility .................................................. ....51

Chapter 5
A Final Reflection .................................................. .......................63

References .................................................. ................................65

Appendix A
Films, Quotations, and Articles .................................................. ....69

Appendix B
Reflection Resources .................................................. ..................71

Appendix C
Reflection Exercises .................................................. ...................73

Appendix D
Bibliography .................................................. ...............................79

Appendix E
Organizations and Web Sites .................................................. .......81

Appendix F
Supplemental Materials .................................................. ...............83



What does it mean to integrate civic responsibility into community college curricula?

For a student, it can mean:

learning actively, not just through lecturing
understanding the skills of active citizenship
participating in service learning by serving in the community, and recognizing that he or she can make a difference and have an impact on one life (e.g., tutoring a child; assisting a homebound senior citizen) or many lives (e.g., implementing a neighborhood watch program; petitioning for a traffic light at a dangerous intersection)


For a faculty member, it can mean:

giving students a chance to reflect on what it means to be a responsible member of society
taking service learning one step further to include reflection on changed attitudes, the impact of the service experience on the individual and the community, and an increased understanding of the responsibilities of living in a democratic society
getting personally involved in service projects, with or without students


For an institution, it can mean:

creating a culture of service and engagement
embracing a mission of educating students for citizenship
taking on greater responsibility to serve the community


For a community partner, it can mean:

creating collaborative partnerships between agencies and faculty
informing and involving individuals in community building
being actively involved in mentoring service learning students through reflection, guidance, and feedback


With these ideas in mind, we address the following questions in this guide:

What is civic responsibility? How is it tied to service learning? How can faculty integrate concepts and exercises in a practical way that will encourage students to develop their own sense of civic responsibility? How can faculty assess the development of civic responsibility in their students?

For the purposes of this publication, civic responsibility means active participation in the public life of a community in an informed, committed, and constructive manner, with a focus on the common good. We define and discuss civic responsibility in depth in chapter 2 (service learning is defined in chapter 1).

While some people categorize civic responsibility as an ethic and civic engagement as a behavior, we use both terms in this guide, as they relate to the same general concepts of involvement in civil society. When we refer to citizens and citizenship, we do so in a broad sense, not limited to official U.S. citizenship but including all residents or members of a community.

This curriculum guide is intended to provide practical, easy-to-use applications for the widest range of faculty who would like to develop their students’ citizenship skills by integrating civic responsibility concepts and practices into their college courses. We recognize that community college faculty teach courses that reflect varying levels of student development, so we have incorporated ideas that can be applied to a large number of courses, from developmental to honors. Similarly, because some faculty may have more flexibility than others in course content or structure, we present activities that can work at several levels of involvement.

We have also taken into account the various disciplines and certificate and degree programs offered at community colleges, so that faculty members from liberal arts, social sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, and vocational and technical programs all may find this guide useful and appropriate for their classes.

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